Tags

, , , ,

Scholastic dishonesty angers me, especially when it comes from individuals who profess to be Christians. I’m used to it from organizations such as the Watchtower Society and the Latter Day Saints. I’ve studied and taught about Jehovah’s Witnesses for nearly 40 years. The Society is notorious for selective quotations taken from respected scholarly books and articles which appear to bolster their heretical doctrines but which, when examined in context, do nothing of the sort. Mormons are quite adept at using common Christian terminology such as trinity, atonement, and justification making them appear to be fully orthodox. However, upon examination it is clear that they completely redefine these terms; what they mean by justification or the atonement is decidely not what historic, orthodox Christianity means by these terms.

Last Janaury [2013] Dr. Joel McDurmon of American Vision posted an article extremely critical of Dr. Michael Horton and the two kingdoms doctrine essentially asserting that the two kingdoms doctrine was responsible for Hilter’s rise in Germany. He cited one scholarly paper which supposedly supported his thesis. Shortly after his article was posted Matthew Tuininga wrote a well documented response to Dr. McDurmon pointing out how McDurmon was guilting of equivocation since the two kingdoms position taken by German pastors during the 1930s and early ’40s is not the same as the two kingdoms doctrine Michael Horton and David VanDrunen (among others) teach and write about. [see http://www.patheos.com/Evangelical/Why-Did-German-Matthew-Tuininga-04-16-2013.html%5D]  I also link to Matthew’s blog, Christian in America over on the left side of this page.

Over the years I’ve noticed that individuals or groups holding extreme theological positions, be they heretical or not, often manipulate or obfuscate the facts to support their agenda. I sincerely believe many within the theonomic and Christian Reconstructionist camp are guilty of scholastic dishonesty and seem to have taken the position that the ends justify their means.

Advertisements